Archive for the 'Life' Category

Old Haunts

Tuesday, March 7th, 2017

We’ve been away: south-west Scotland. In February. I didn’t fancy the warmer options (as it involves a metal cylinder full of bastards), so my better half booked some places, and we hit the M6 to head north and do some B&B hopping.

First stop: Annan. We’d not been here before, and it’s a very noticeably Scottish town for one so close to the border: red sandstone, scottish baronial clock tower on the town hall,

Annan’s town hall clock tower


and the odd other bit of Victorian excess, now faded. We stayed in one, and I walked past another one morning: a glorious money pit of a hotel:

The Central Hotel: currently disused. Copyright Richard Dorrell and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

The last time it was for sale, it had a guide price of £150K: I’d guess you’d need many times that to restore it, and I strongly doubt you’d make it back: Annan was a nice town, with some good pubs, but it’s not got masses of tourism or masses of cash.

It has, however, got a reborn distillery that Professor David Thomson was brave enough to restore– and the curiously named Devil’s Porridge Museum nearby.

Next call was Portpatrick: postcard-pretty harbour, and a nice hotel for a couple of nights. We popped to Stranraer, which is still a bit grotty, and on to Port William. That’s Port, not Fort. Beware the mistake, and automatic suggestions from websites: we nearly misbooked, and we’re not the first, according to a previous landlord of the Monreith Arms over 20 years ago. Our last stop was Ecclefechan, for no better reason than the hotel is lovely, and a bargain.

We’d last been to South West Scotland in 2009, but not come further west than Castle Douglas: it was well over 20 years since coming this far over, and it was surprising: not a lot had changed, to be honest, but Port William was prettier than we remembered, and Glenluce tattier…

Festival

Saturday, February 18th, 2017

This year’s drinking challenge is to be 10 beer festivals. We did consider making it CAMRA festivals only, but given our continual logistical problems, and that basically, it’s just an excuse for some good company and a piss-up, we’ve made it easy: anything advertised as a beer festival qualifies, and three members have to be present. No transport rules this time, but no-one will be in any hurry to drive…

Scoring is going to be a bit odd, I think. The best we could agree on is:

1 point per beer advertised, and one more for each available.
1 point per cider advertised, and one more for each available.
10 point bonus if we get JC to attend.
1 point extra for any bonus people outside of the core membership who attend.
100 possible points for the venue, divided between the core membership- so if 4 attend, each can allocate up to 25 points.

I personally think will produce some totally skewed results, but can’t suggest anything better :-).

Thirteen

Sunday, January 1st, 2017

This blog has just passed it’s thirteenth birthday, and we’re at the start of a new year, a year that’s to be honest, brought little to be happy about in many ways: the loss of many celebrities (and for once, the word celebrity is actually valid here), and, perhaps more importantly for some of us, the unexpected loss in November of Steph Clarke, who should be an inspiration to anyone wanting to do stuff in their community. I was lucky enough to meet her a few times, and her energy and commitment to help people was just unreal. A sad loss to the local community, both online and off. I usually use this post to say how strong the online community is (which is still true), so it’s sad to lose such a big part of it. There’s an ongoing drive to do something good, however small, in her memory- #stuffforsteph, which I’d urge anyone to take part in.

2016 has, generally, been pretty poor- personally, nothing major at all- but we’ve had the idiocy of Brexit, with the corresponding rise of hate crime, a quite spectacularly inept prime minister, and the election of a dangerous halfquarter-wit in the US. In the computing world, we saw the IP Bill pass into law, so someone besides me knows you’re reading this, and the Digital Economy Bill is on its way. The future’s so bright, I gotta wear shades.

Looking forward to 2017, I’d like to wish everyone a happy new year: let’s hope for a better one: as Brownhills Bob said online recently, we can at least hope that Trump might fall out of an aeroplane and hit Farage on the way down.

Merry Christmas

Sunday, December 25th, 2016

It’s Christmas morning. Festivity took a while to kick in this year, but when work was finished, a couple of pub trips with good friends and the traditional Christmas eve curry did the trick. I’m hangover-free, and I’ve had bacon too.

Happy Christmas everyone.

A Day Out

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

I was off work, and as is traditional, we went off to Birmingham for a couple of pints. A start by dropping off the 51 at The Tennis Court, a diversion to The Woodman, a bus ride to Balsall Heath and the lovely Old Moseley Arms, another diversion (because of gridlock in Digbeth to the every lovely Anchor, and home via a curry. Some lovely beer (though this was perhaps a bit stronger than would be adviseable after 5-6 pints, even if it was delicious), and a pleasant day out.

Some you win

Friday, November 4th, 2016

Time I blogged a bit more…

A week of differing days: starting with a very long day, and a failed Internet connection and firewall migration (which had to be reverted), followed by another late finish, followed by a hospital appointment with a long wait (and having arrived early in order to park, that made it a very long one) and a vile, stop-start rush hour drive back through Brum, along with the accompaniment of an ominous rattle from the car, sounding like I was dragging a wind chime.

Today was improved: the rattle went, and after a check by my friendly local VW specialist, we agreed it was probably nothing more than a stone trapped in a brake disc shield, which then dropped out at some point. A grim drive from there to work, but then things start to improve later in the day: I did have a spare PCI ethernet card in my desk to connect a failing wireless network, the IPCop firewall PC did have a spare slot and the drivers for the card, I did know the password, and it all just worked, which meant a 4pm finish, and a surprisingly good journey home.

With a bit more time on my hands, it’s easier to persuade myself go for a quick spin on the bike to Chasewater. Rush hour was still in progress on the roads, but the towpath was literally almost deserted (I met one person, one cat and one fox in over 6 miles) and peaceful, but tough going after a week and a half not riding. The compensation for dragging my corpulent carcass out on a dark and relatively cold night is that I’ve reclaimed my towpaths from the armies of dog walkers, anglers, fair-weather cyclists, and pokemon hunters that are all over the place on the lighter, warmer evenings (though to be fair there was one pokemon hunter at Chasewater itself).

I’m now hoping my plan to leave early today (Friday) comes to fruition. A plan for the cinema, some beer and some food is forming….

Taphouse 6: The Park Inn

Saturday, July 23rd, 2016

PubBlog Link
Whatpub Link
Brewery Site

Taphouse 6, again with a brewery actually onsite- Holdens.

The Park Inn, with added Pete.

The Park Inn, with added Pete.

I was less enthusiastic than my last visit (but then, I was suffering with a worsening hangover), and we all agreed that while there was nothing wrong, it missed something. Pleasant enough, though.

Ambience 7.3
Beer choice/quality 8.6
Architecture 6
Cobs/Pies/Snacks 7
Toilets 6

Which means an overall score of 6.98.

Taphouse 5: The Beacon Hotel

Saturday, July 23rd, 2016

PubBlog Link
Whatpub Link
Twitter

Taphouse 5, with a brewery actually onsite- Sarah Hughes.

Beacon Hotel. Image from Google.

Beacon Hotel. Image from Google.

More details in the PubBlog post. It’s still as good as ever, 3 years later.

Ambience 10
Beer choice/quality 8.3
Architecture 9
Cobs/Pies/Snacks 10
Toilets 6

Which means an overall score of 8.66, which I think makes it the leader so far.

A Tale of Two Crap Towns

Sunday, June 12th, 2016

We’ve been away, and as I still didn’t fancy the long drive required for Scotland that we often take at this time of year, we went a bit closer- Morecambe. Morecambe has something in common with Walsall: Public ridicule by up-themselves arseholes.

Morecambe faomusly gained 3rd place in the original Crap Towns book in 2003, but by 2013’s “crap Towns 3” it has gained “not so crap” status. Walsall, was once famously described by Theodore Dalrymple as “Ceaucescu’s Romania with fast food outlets”, which brought forth one of the few times I found myself agreeing with Mike Bird, and is rumoured to have appeared in one of the books, but I couldn’t find it.
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Bristol City

Monday, March 7th, 2016

We went away for a few days, and my better half suggested Bristol. We’d never been, so it seemed like a good idea; pubs, restaurants, thibngs to see, and not too far to go. Given that parking was going to be expensive, and driving has certainly lost its allure these days, we chose to go by train. A lift to Walsall from a friend one Saturday morning saw us experience the joy of Walsall station, a structure seemingly designed to suck the joy of life from you (and no BOAK building as a comforting sight any more), but it is at least functional, and with a simple layout; something you can’t level at the glitter-rolled turd that is New Street and Grand Central now.

[note: at this point I split off my whining about New St to a separate post]

Anyway, enough whining. On to our train, and the bliss of first class (and without costing the earth, thanks to pre-booking), and around 90 mins later we’re at Temple Meads: a very different matter: Victorian, magnificent, easy to navigate, and within a few minutes, we’re in a cab. Our appartment wasn’t ready, so there’s only one place to go:

The Bag of Nails. Beer, cats, pie, music.

The Bag of Nails. Beer, cats, pie, music.

The Bag of Nails. A few pints in the company of kitties, and a half-mile walk across town past the stunning cathedral to the apartment, before heading out.

Bristol’s a nice city: architecture, pubs, restaurants, and things to see and do, and not remotely up itself, which suits me. We took an open-top bus tour (always a good way to orientate yourself), looked around the amazing ss Great Britain in its dehumidified dry dock, walked over the Clifton suspension bridge and wandered around Clifton, and looked around the Aquarium and cathedral after we’d tired ourselves out walking back and didn’t want to walk too far. Obviously, between those activities, we visited a few pubs too. There’s the usual suspects in chain pubs, chain restaurants, and chain stores, but look about and there’s independent places everywhere.

Coming back was a pain-free experience too: a bus to Temple Meads, train to New St (ugh), and on to Walsall, and a bus saw us home in great time (TM to home in under 3 hours), stress-free.


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