Tag Archives: ale

The Rose & Crown

Bury St Edmunds:

Lovely edge-of-town pub. Very traditional inside and out. Greene King again, but some guest beer (Landlord, which was great), and really friendly staff and customers. If i found myself moving to Bury St Edmunds, this would be my local. Food only at lunchtimes, it seems- this place is primarily a community drinking pub with lots of community activities centred on it.

The Nutshell

Bury St Edmunds:

Once officially recognised as Britain’s smallest pub, and still claiming so, this is seriously small pub, at 15ft x 7ft, but doesn’t seem to be actually the smallest now.

It was, however, ….cozy. We went in mid-afternoon, reasoning it might be quieter, and managed to get a seat, just, but it seems people rotate between outside and drinking (sadly, local laws don’t allow drinking outside). Needless to say, no food, as there’s only one table. There’s one toilet, up a very steep set of stairs. Beer is Greene King, but well kept Greene King. Staff and locals very friendly. The Pubcat, though, looked a bit skinny and didn’t want attention.

The Dog & Partridge

Bury St Edmunds:

This was the first pub we found walking into town from our hotel, and we needed lunch, having been up early that morning. Outside looks traditional, inside is a modern Greene King (who else, that close to the brewery?) pubco makeover, so stripped boards and green paint.

I was ready to not be keen, because there was a bit of a hipster air about the place too, so that coupled with decor and GK beer wasn’t encouraging, but in the event it was fine: the sandwiches were nice, there was guest beer, the music wasn’t too loud and the staff were really pleasant. We visited again that evening, and the food wasn’t bad then, and the music wasn’t deafening, so overall, pretty good. There’s romms here too, and they seemed to be in a seperate building to the pub.

The York Hotel

Morecambe:

On the edge of town, right next to the railway, this is, again, technically a hotel, but doesn’t serve food, just providing rooms. Outside, it’s a fair-sized stone hotel building, inside, it’s a traditional pub, quite big, and recently refurbished in a pubco kind of way. Friendly staff, good beer, and bargain-priced stay if you don’t mind having to eat out and a 5min walk to town.

The Morecambe Hotel

Morecambe:

Some discussion over if this was a pub or not, and we decided it just scraped it: It *is* a hotel, and even the pub bit feels a bit restauranty, but there *is* a drinking area at the front, which is more can be said for some so-called pubs. It’s very, very gastropub inside- modern, stripped floors etc, but evidently a lot of money has been spent inside and out. Great beer, staff pleasant enough, but we felt a bit pounced-on by the staff all clustered around the bar when we walked in. I think they’re more expecting diners.

The Boatyard Inn

Garth, Bangor, North Wales:

Just around the corner. This was in many ways lovely: the staff were great, the beer great, the food great: but this had just gone a bit too far towards restaurant to be great; in fact, I considered not allowing it into PubBlog, but it redeemed itself the next day with a great beer garden (and the surrounding competition, apart from the Tap & Spile being awful).

The Tap & Spile

Garth, Bangor, North Wales:

Overlooking the pier, and next to our hotel, this was the obvious place for lunch, and we weren’t disappointed: decent beer, great food, and a friendly barman made this the best pub of our trip, and potentially the best in Bangor, given the competition we saw. Traditional pub inside and out, food available but not subtracting from the pub.

The Queens Head

Wednesbury:

Close to all the delights of the border between Walsall and Wednesbury: M6 Junction 9, Ikea, a surplus of nice old houses that have become care homes.

That’s sounding quite negative. In actual fact, where the pub is situated is a surprisingly quiet resdential street that wraps around Brunswick Park, with a mix of old and new housing. We sat outside, next to the street, in the sun, and it was nice. I’d not been here before, and my better half hadn’t been here since college days over 20 years ago, when Sandwell College was just the other side of the A461. The pub itself is a traditional one, almost certainly Victorian given the name and the history of the park. It’s had a fairly typical makeover, but it hasn’t removed the character (and it looks fresh and tidy), and while food is a big part of the business, that hasn’t destroyed that this is a pub.

Very friendly staff, decent beer, good food.

The Crystal Fountain

Cannock:

Been meaning to come here for a while: it’s a big, 1937 pub in a minor road close to Cannock town centre, and the interior is on CAMRA’s inventory with good reason: it was carefully restored in 2012 by Black Country Inns, and the inside is now tidy, smart, but still authentic to the age. Really friendly landlord, great beer, lovely beer garden, and a Arriva 2 Sapphire stops outside the door…