Tag Archives: digbeth

The Moseley Arms

Digbeth, Birmingham:

Not to be confused with The Old Moseley Arms.

A hotel, really, but the bar feels pubby. Friendly staff, big, opened-out bar area, cheapish food. No ale, but decent lager and wine, probably not a bad place to stay given the price: city centre walkable in around 15 min. TVs playing sport, but not too loud. Quite an old place originally, but no historic features inside, and big modern extension outside.

The Spotted Dog

Digbeth, Birmingham:

Lovely, traditional Birmingham pub. Multi-roomed, so the entertainment at times need not disturb people after a quiet pint. Lovely friendly staff, great beer (Fixed Wheel No Brakes when we visited), good bar snacks, and a nice vibe. Benches out front with a (urban!) view to the city. About the only problem is the limited hours in the week (no lunchtime opening Mon-fri).

Revisit: The Anchor

Original Post Here

Digbeth, Birmingham.

The Anchor has long been one of the go-to pubs in Brum: it’s a typical, magnificent terracotta James & Lister Lea Birmingham pub: traditional, with great beer.

That’s mostly still true. The beer’s great, the staff are friendly, but the creeping gentrification of Digbeth has put a bit of a shine on it (when I preferred it without). There’s some middle-class-green paintwork that looks a bit out of place, and some “quirky” decoration that has the faint whiff of hipster. It’s still a great pub overall though: great staff and beer, OK music, nice outside space. No food now, though.

The Eagle and Tun

Digbeth, Birmingham:

Right next to The Woodman, another fine old Victorian pub, and another James & Lister lea building for Ansells. Empty and derelict since 2008, it was once a very sad sight, isolated while development went on around it, and with only local listing, the future didn’t look good- as recently as 2012, it looked like both would be flattened, along with The Fox and Grapes. As we’ve seen, The Woodman was saved first, and as we walked past on our last visit, we noticed the Eagle & Tun was about to re-open, and it now has.

It is well known for the UB40 Connection- the video for Red Red Wine was shot there, as was the cover for the first Best of UB40 album, as the studios for DEP International were just around the corner in Andover St.

Anyway, the pub itself? Outside is typical Brum terracotta. Inside is less salubrious than The Woodman, and a work-in-progress, clearly, but the atmosphere was pleasant (if cold!), the barman was very friendly, and the drinks cheap (and decent enough too, even if the HPA ran out before I got a pint). The pub is playing on the UB40 connection, with that being the choice of music. There’s still the stunning tiles at one end, and the feel of a proper Brum pub too.

Revisits: The Old Crown

Original post here.

Pleasant enough still, but it’s been affected by the plague of hipster tosspots, so the food’s a bit fussy (brioche fucking buns and twatting ciabatta again), and the Pedigree was rough (though when Andy decided he couldn’t bear it, it was changed without question). When it came, the food was actually fine, but what’s wrong with bread?

Still worth a visit, just not what it was.

The Woodman

Digbeth:

Another fine James & Lister Lea Birmingham terracotta pub, right next to Curzon St station and Millenium Point, and not far from the sadly empty and run-down Eagle & Tun. It’s a fine pub: good food (or it looked it- we didn’t eat) at a very reasonable price, several real ales and ciders, and craft beer too. We were sat in the least attractive room, the bar, and it was still nice, the other rooms are grander- it’s the traditional terracotta and tile arrangement. Staff were pleasant, and there’s a mix of clientele- though plenty from the nearby BCU.

The refurb and subsequent re-opening last year has done it proud: it’s not over-restored but is smart and maintains it’s original features.