Compare the Meraki

(The title thanks to my colleagues who misread the SSID (Meraki-test1)I sent them by email)

I’ve been playing with wireless networks a good bit at work: I’ve finally got PEAP going to do 802.1x authentication- the practical result being WPA-2 Enterprise wireless networking with the Cisco 1600i access points. As I’ve commented before, Cisco gear is great, but it can be a game to get going when you come across something new, and this was the case here: there were guides for doing this with wireless LAN contoller systems, but not for autonomous APs, and the interface was just different enough to confuse. Getting the right amount of debug info was tricky too.

Enter Meraki. Like earlier with Aironet, they’re now a division of Cisco, which makes me wonder if we’ll see a merging of product…

Meraki
‘s product is a [*cough*] cloud-based solution. It pains me to say that. Cloud is today’s IT bullshit phrase that is just a new way of saying things. “In the cloud” means “on a server or servers somewhere on the Internet”: the cloud everything bollocks wears thin after a while, but here’s a clever application.

You unpack the AP, power it up, and connect it to any Internet connection. The AP establishes a connection to “the cloud” [cough]bollocks[/cough], and establishes a tunnel. You log into a web page, enter the serial number, place a marker on a Google map, and then manage the device from the web:

The clever dashboard

The clever dashboard

From there you can implement multiple SSIDs, Captive portals, the aforementioned 802.1x, you can monitor devices and applications, time access, and create mesh networks that will track clients (handy for marketing tossers) and all manner of stuff, with an embarrasingly few mouse clicks compared to the pain of a conventional Cisco AP. It’s quick too.

Sounds too good to be true?

Maybe. There is a downside. While the dashboard is impressive, it costs. The APs themselves are a similar price to an enterprise-level conventional AP (a good 300-400 quid or so list), but on top of that, you need a licence for the dashboard (£150 for 1 device for one year list, reducing for quantity), and without the licence, your AP is an expensive ornament.

There’s applications that are a perfect fit: if you have remote sites with no IT staff, the Meraki devices can be shipped with no config, then set up remotely. Potentially big savings there. The tools on the dash are very clever too, but you’re tying yourself to the cloud dash for a few years, effectively leasing the kit.

Next on the list? Aerohive, who seem to do the clever online managment but still allow local config, so no tie-in.

One Response to “Compare the Meraki”

  1. Willenhall Lad Says:

    We’ve done four Meraki installs and they all work well. There is lots you can do to manage them and also, extend you network over the WAN if you wish.

    They are pricey, but they do handle a lot of clients well – we’ve a setup in a local Arts Centre and they seem pretty pleased as it’s easy for them to manage it themselves. One thing though: make sure you have them back-hauled to a 1GB PoE switch. That makes it unnecessary to have power nearby thus you can put them in ceilings without having to get the sparky in. Also, a good heat map survey is vital so you can predict how they will work and what interference is around although the Marakis are good at dodging round problems. If you want to have a look at a bigger setup, let me know.


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